Interior Design

Design 101

Balancing Act

Bringing balance to room creates a sense of ease and equilibrium. In interior design balance requires distributing visual weight appropriately.  It is both the avoidance of overemphasis or disregard for a given space within a room.  Either of these create an interior that appears lopsided. There are three types of balance: symmetrical, asymmetrical and radial.

Symmetrical Balance

Symmetrical balance requires a centerline creating a balance point for the arrangement.  In essence, one half is the mirror image of the other.  The image below is a great example of symmetrical balance and is very often used in formal settings such as living rooms.

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Image courtesy of freshome.com

Asymmetrical Balance

In asymmetrical balance, unequal objects are placed at unequal distances from the centerline. That said, the visual weight of the size and color of objects is evenly distributed.  In other words, you want to create visual balance on each side of the centerline.  Below is an example of asymmetrical balance.  Asymmetrical balance typically lends itself to modern or informal settings.

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Image courtesy of freshome.com

Radial Balance

Radial balance is circular and the objects are balanced around a central pivot point.  This type is balance is very often found in a dining room where the center of the dining table is the hub around which the objects are arranged.  The image below is an example of radial balance.

balance_radial

Interior Design

Design 101

Texture

Let’s review…the eight elements of design are:

  1. Line
  2. Form
  3. Color
  4. Value
  5. Texture
  6. Pattern
  7. Light
  8. Space

In this weeks Design 101 blog we are going to focus on Texture. Texture is defined as the feel, appearance or consistence of a substance or surface.  Texture, in harmony, with the other elements helps to provide balance and visual interest to a room. In addition to overall balance, you need to consider the balance among texture – all smooth or all rough will create a feeling of monotony.  A nubby tweed sofa works better with a smooth throw pillow and a leather couch work better with a wool knitted fabric.  Here is an example of how texture can be used successfully.

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Image courtesy of decorpad.com

The soft velvet sofa plays well against the rough exposed brick wall. The room also feature smooth and shiny objects such as the glass coffee table, metal legs and arms of the furniture which are contrasted by the matte hues of the velvet chair fabric and rugs.  When selecting furniture for a room, keep this balance of opposites in mind and the room will not only look professionally decorated but will also project a comfortable and welcoming mood.

How do you combine texture in your rooms?  Post your photos.

Interior Design, Uncategorized

Design 101 – Form

As noted previously, the eight elements of design are:

  1. Line
  2. Form
  3. Color
  4. Value
  5. Texture
  6. Pattern
  7. Light
  8. Space

In last Monday’s blog we reviewed line.  This week we are going to take a look at form.

Similar, to line, the form of objects in your interior are influenced by nature.  Whether it be spherical, triangular, cone, square of rectangle, you want to make sure you the right blend of form and find opportunities to both contrast and repeat those forms.  A combination of form gives this room visual interest.  Without that, a room might look monotonous and uninviting.

form.pngPhoto: Eric Piasecki, Courtesy of Deringhall.com

How do you use line in you home?  Share your pictures.